ARTS Blog & Press

  • Aerospace Innovation
  • Christian Vetterlein
Textiles in industry – The importance of modern textiles in the aerospace industry

Textiles in industry – The importance of modern textiles in the aerospace industry

Textiles have always played an important role in optimising air travel. Materials such as silk or canvas were some of the first materials used in aircraft and, without the weight reduction that they provide, our pioneers would not have been able to fly at all. Today, high-performance textiles play a major role in increasing efficiency and flexibility while reducing costs.

  • Place to Work
  • Success-Stories
  • Melanie Wolf
How ARTS supports Airbus at the Centre of Applied Aeronautical Research (ZAL) copyright ZAL

How ARTS supports Airbus at the Centre of Applied Aeronautical Research (ZAL)

Hamburg’s answer to Silicon Valley for the aeronautical sector – ZAL – and Airbus Operations don’t just work together on projects financed by the aerospace industry, but also on some publicly-financed projects. ARTS expert, Gunnar Zawistowski, is supporting Airbus in those projects with his expertise in controlling, reporting, and securing research funding.

  • Career Advice
  • Franziska Hamann
The aviation sector in France – an attractive career opportunity © pixabay

The aviation sector in France – an attractive career opportunity

Working abroad is a major career goal for many workers, and in the aviation and space sectors, the chance to spend time abroad is particularly achievable due to the large number of manufacturers and suppliers with international operations. France is the best example of this, as our author, Franziska Hamann, explains.

  • Essential to Take Off 2017
  • Christian Vetterlein
Henri Fabre – Paving the way for flight over water © Gregor Behling

Henri Fabre – Paving the way for flight over water

The first successful flight undertaken in a seaplane allowed the French aviation pioneer, Henri Fabre, to pave the way for the first transatlantic flights. The Hydravion seaplane, which could be recognised by its distinctive, “canard” construction, first emerged from the water on 28 March 1910. Fabre’s success inspired the whole aviation world and made later transatlantic flights possible.